Climate Shock and Domestic Violence

In this paper, we study the causal relationship between rainfall shock and incidence of domestic violence using the nationally representative India Human Development Survey (IHDS) and annual rainfall data.

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Abstract

In this paper, we study the causal relationship between rainfall shock and incidence of domestic violence using the nationally representative India Human Development Survey (IHDS) and annual rainfall data. We find that rainfall reduces the incidence of domestic violence in rural India by about one-third. Specifically, married women in Indian agrarian households are 33% less likely to face domestic violence in a wet shock district than in a district affected by drought. This result supports the notion that domestic violence is largely associated with negative household income shocks and is robust to alternative drought and domestic violence indicators.

Publication
Population Association of America Conference 2018 Meetings, Colorado, CO, USA

Presented at

  • Population Association of America, Colorado, CO [April 2018].

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Herman Sahni
Assistant Professor of Finance

My research interests include labor economics, health economics, and corporate finance.